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annstreetstudio:

We’re having a spring fling with Ecco Domani! See what recipe food stylist Molly Shuster suggests as a perfect pairing for Ecco Domani Pinot Grigio…

To everyone except a dedicated ideologue, it was pretty obvious that we invaded Iraq not because of our love of democracy but because it’s maybe the second- or third-largest source of oil in the world, and is right in the middle of the major energy-producing region. You’re not supposed to say this. It’s considered a conspiracy theory.
Noam Chomsky  (via cayso)
Hahaha!!!! Totally true.

Hahaha!!!! Totally true.

When a thing disturbs the peace of your heart, give it up.
Prophet Muhammad (pbuh)

moghamara:

My day in Adʿiyah

I love it!!! The constant mindfulness of God and His creation, of ourselves and our place in it, is something any believer can relate to whatever we might call God.

A flower does not think of competing to the flower next to it. It just blooms.
from Zen Shin Talks (via lustambitions)
Don’t think about what can happen in a month. Don’t think about what can happen in a year. Just focus on the 24 hours in front of you and do what you can to get closer to where you want to be.
Eric Thomas (via rainysundaysandcoffee)
guardian:

Senate takes on gender pay gap bill
American women are paid, on average, between 64 to 90 cents for every dollar paid to men, according to a new state-by-state analysis by the National Partnership for Women and Families that comes as Congress and the White House take steps to address the gender pay gap.
Across the nation, women who work full time earn on average 77 cents for every dollar paid to men, an annual wage gap of $11,607 that is especially relevant to more than 15 million US households led by women, the study found. A third of households led by women live in poverty. Read more
Pictured: Senate majority leader Harry Reid urges passage of legislation that would establish ‘paycheck fairness’ in wages paid to women. Photograph: Win McNamee/Getty

guardian:

Senate takes on gender pay gap bill

American women are paid, on average, between 64 to 90 cents for every dollar paid to men, according to a new state-by-state analysis by the National Partnership for Women and Families that comes as Congress and the White House take steps to address the gender pay gap.

Across the nation, women who work full time earn on average 77 cents for every dollar paid to men, an annual wage gap of $11,607 that is especially relevant to more than 15 million US households led by women, the study found. A third of households led by women live in poverty. Read more

Pictured: Senate majority leader Harry Reid urges passage of legislation that would establish ‘paycheck fairness’ in wages paid to women. Photograph: Win McNamee/Getty

blackmountainmass:

Even solid air is a phosphorescent body.
[First photograph ever taken by phosphorescent light. The face is that of Mr. Tesla, and the source of light is one of his phosphorescent bulbs. Time of exposure, eight minutes. Date of photograph January, 1894.]
NATURE 1902 | Nature, Volume LXVI, May to October 1902

blackmountainmass:

Even solid air is a phosphorescent body.

[First photograph ever taken by phosphorescent light. The face is that of Mr. Tesla, and the source of light is one of his phosphorescent bulbs. Time of exposure, eight minutes. Date of photograph January, 1894.]

NATURE 1902 | Nature, Volume LXVI, May to October 1902

futurejournalismproject:

Rwanda, 20 Years Later
Twenty years ago this week, the Rwandan genocide began. It’s estimated 800,000 to a million people were killed over 100 days. Most were Tutsi but tens of thousands were moderate Hutu and others caught in the slaughter.
The country today is commemorating by holding a week of mourning alongside a longer 100-day vigil.
The #Rwanda20yrs hashtag on Twitter is an at times sobering, enlightening and inspiring access point to news, resources and personal accounts of the period.
Here’s some of what we’ve been reading through:
BBC, Rwanda genocide: 100 days of slaughter; a backgrounder on the events.
BBC, A good man in Rwanda; the story of Mbaye Diagne, an unarmed, Senegalese peacekeeper with the UN, who’s credited with saving at least 500 Rwandans.
Thomson Reuters Foundation, Genocide and Justice: Rwanda 20 years on; an immersive site with first person accounts from survivors, perpetrators, diplomats and more.
The Guardian, Genocide in Rwanda was a fork in the road not just for Africa but the world; how the genocide has affected international law and world response to events today.
Slate, Unreconciled Rwanda; can survivors really forgive those that murdered family and loved ones, and what policies has the Rwandan government put in place to foster reconciliation attempts.
Image: Via National Geographic, “A man tries to unlock a cell door at a hospital in Kigali, Rwanda in 1994. As the genocide spread across the country, doctors and staff of the main psychological hospital in Kigali fled or were killed leaving the patients to care for themselves.” Photo by David Guttenfelder. Revisiting the Rwandan Genocide: Origin Stories From The Associated Press. Select to embiggen.

futurejournalismproject:

Rwanda, 20 Years Later

Twenty years ago this week, the Rwandan genocide began. It’s estimated 800,000 to a million people were killed over 100 days. Most were Tutsi but tens of thousands were moderate Hutu and others caught in the slaughter.

The country today is commemorating by holding a week of mourning alongside a longer 100-day vigil.

The #Rwanda20yrs hashtag on Twitter is an at times sobering, enlightening and inspiring access point to news, resources and personal accounts of the period.

Here’s some of what we’ve been reading through:

Image: Via National Geographic, “A man tries to unlock a cell door at a hospital in Kigali, Rwanda in 1994. As the genocide spread across the country, doctors and staff of the main psychological hospital in Kigali fled or were killed leaving the patients to care for themselves.” Photo by David Guttenfelder. Revisiting the Rwandan Genocide: Origin Stories From The Associated Press. Select to embiggen.

themindscanvas:

Franco Pace Photography.


:D!!!!

themindscanvas:

Franco Pace Photography.

:D!!!!

There’s this idea of privacy that draws me in; it’s almost like a cocoon of solace and refuge.

There’s this idea of privacy that draws me in; it’s almost like a cocoon of solace and refuge.

The problem is that white people see racism as conscious hate, when racism is bigger than that. Racism is a complex system of social and political levers and pulleys set up generations ago to continue working on the behalf of whites at other people’s expense, whether whites know/like it or not. Racism is an insidious cultural disease. It is so insidious that it doesn’t care if you are a white person who likes black people; it’s still going to find a way to infect how you deal with people who don’t look like you. Yes, racism looks like hate, but hate is just one manifestation. Privilege is another. Access is another. Ignorance is another. Apathy is another. And so on. So while I agree with people who say no one is born racist, it remains a powerful system that we’re immediately born into. It’s like being born into air: you take it in as soon as you breathe. It’s not a cold that you can get over. There is no anti-racist certification class. It’s a set of socioeconomic traps and cultural values that are fired up every time we interact with the world. It is a thing you have to keep scooping out of the boat of your life to keep from drowning in it. I know it’s hard work, but it’s the price you pay for owning everything.
Scott Wood (X)